Save Ourselves from Trampland

Revive your forgotten blogs, spread the news however you can. We have a problem in the White House. Jingoism, anti-education, racist, misogynistic with absurd  new legislation knocking out Obamacare, NEH, etc.

POTUS (???) Donald Trump, the unfettered tramp of gold and private female parts grabbing, has our country in his reigns and it does not look good. Read, compare, contrast, decide for yourself. Then do something. Is this the world we want?

Below, with a new score by The New Pollutants, is an allegorical, or metaphorical, film made in 1927, but very current in a uneasy way. It’s a bit hokey and male predominant and registering the manufacturing era, but a case can be made for parallels in our most inappropriate presidency.

Metropolis directed by Fritz Lang: http://bit.ly/1MLQFWG

Happy Birthday, There’s a Corpse in Your Cake!

Strangely Interesting.

Nourishing Death

Last week I came across a photograph of an item that was, at one time, available for purchase on Etsy. A small, metal viewing coffin with the unnerving inscription, “Don’t talk so much.” From the viewing window a strange, pale countenance started out. 

Image

Unfortunately, there was no further information attached to the item, just a lot of unanswered questions. Who made this? When? Why? What’s with the mega creepy inscription that seems almost threatening in tone? I’m afraid I still don’t have any answers to these questions after a week of research. However, the little corpse in the coffin had some stories to tell. 

These are no ordinary playthings. The dolls originated in the US during the Victorian era, around 1860 and were called Frozen Charlottes, (or Charlie for males), dolls. The dolls were made in response to the enormous popularity of a song, “Fair Charlotte,” which was based…

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God of the Week: Typhon

Subject of new book art sculpture/project.

This Hollow Earth

03/12/2012: Typhon

Typhon was the son of Tartarus and Gaia, and father of all monsters. He was pretty tall; reached all the way up to the stars. Which, admittedly, was a lot shorter back then than it is today. Back then, the stars used to be affixed to the firmament, which disappeared sometime around the invention of modern science. Now the stars are light years away.

One of the most powerful monsters who opposed Zeus in this war was called Typhon or Typhoeus. He was the youngest son of Tartarus and Gæa, and had a hundred heads, with eyes which struck terror to the beholders, and awe-inspiring voices frightful to hear. This dreadful monster resolved to conquer both gods and men, but his plans were at length defeated by Zeus, who, after a violent encounter, succeeded in destroying him with a thunderbolt, but not before he had so terrified the gods that they…

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The Huygens Enigma

We all need a bit of Dutch scientist info. This is especially good material.

The Renaissance Mathematicus

The seventeenth century produced a large number of excellent scientific researches and mathematicians in Europe, several of whom have been elevated to the status of giants of science or even gods of science by the writers of the popular history of science. Regular readers of this blog should be aware that I don’t believe in the gods of science, but even I am well aware that not all researches are equal and the contributions of some of them are much greater and more important than those of others, although the progress of science is dependent on the contributions of all the players in the science game. Keeping to the game analogy, one could describe them as playing in different leagues. One thing that has puzzled me for a number of years is what I regard as the Huygens enigma. There is no doubt in my mind whatsoever that the Dutch…

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New Class: Box Making Beyond the Rectangle

Be off for too long. Here’s a wonderful class for new book inventions.

Midnight Musings

Join me for a new class beginning Friday, April 15th at the Palo Alto Art Center. The class will run for 10 weeks and we will make non-rectangular boxes including a triangle, a pyramid, a circle and a hexagon. Classes are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fridays. Sign up by calling the Palo Alto Art Center or enrolling using their online system. Only two spaces remaining in the class!

Below are photos of the magnetic pyramid box we’ll be making. Don’t miss out!

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The Age of Consent to Marry in the Regency Period

When working one forgets there is a blog to maintain. Here is a post concerning historic realities.

ReginaJeffers's Blog

18th and 19th Century: Gretna Green - The Place for Elopements 18thcand19thc.blogspot. com 18th and 19th Century: Gretna Green – The Place for Elopements
18thcand19thc.blogspot.
com

During the Regency, despite what some authors may include within the story line, the age of consent for females was twenty-one, not twenty-five as some would lead the reader to believe. Although I do not know from where the idea of the female having a guardian until age 25, what I assume is happening is the author (and therefore, the reader) is confusing the idea of a female’s guardianship with the age of majority. The confusion likely comes from fathers or another person setting up a trust for a female. The trust would provide the woman a “fortune” at age 25 or when she married (if she married with the approval of the man named as guardian of her money.)  

If the woman did not have her guardian’s approval (and was less that age 21) and chose to marry, she just would not…

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