The Book Project Continues

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In late December Nick and I exchanged the last books of 2014. Nick had made some lovely etchings and presented them Japanese stab bound:

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My book was the result of many, many failed (complex) paper engineering ideas, simplified down to the basics:

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This is by far the toughest sentence I’ve been given so far, a stubborn double negative – “This is something you cannot not mind about” that I have bludgeoned into submission and managed to forge another ‘not’ (a triple negative, perhaps?) for good measure.

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There is more to come though, and a new sentence was exchanged as well. Watch this space!

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La photo marocaine qui affole l’Etat islamique

Le blog de l'équipe d'Artisthick

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“Le regard qui effraie l’EI”, la photographie d’un journaliste marocain

Moyennement médiatisée, cette image passée inaperçue dans la presse marocaine ne quitte plus jamais l’esprit une fois regardée. Avec sa tignasse blonde et ses yeux bleus pénétrants, le regard de cette jeune fille yézidie de 6 ans en dit long sur l’exode de ce peuple las, victime d’un affreux génocide. La photographie publiée en novembre 2014 par le photojournaliste marocain de l’agence Reuters Youssef Boudlal fait partie d’une série de clichés pris en août dans le village de Fishkabur à la frontière irako-syrienne alors que la minorité irakienne fuit l’Etat Islamique. Attendant l’aide des kurdes peshmargas, la fillette assise auprès de sa mère sous le soleil brûlant éblouit le photographe qui se dit “fasciné par sa beauté sauvage dans cette situation dramatique”.

Youssef Boudlal de l'agence Reuters Youssef Boudlal de l’agence Reuters

Quand une œuvre d’art devient une arme politique

Les yézidis sont un peuple…

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A Cloudy Afternoon in Paris

kateantiquity

According to Agence France-Presse, over 2.5 million people gathered at the Place de la République earlier today for the Marche Républicaine to mourn seventeen victims – fifteen men and two women; Jews, Muslims, Christians and atheists among them – of brutal violence first at the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and subsequently at other sites.

Early this afternoon, I was deeply moved by the image broadcast by the Mairie de Paris today, honouring the two police officers who died in the attacks, and gently refusing to let the event become an accusation against the minority religions of France, and I found myself, through the course of the day, among the further millions who found their minds and hearts returning to Paris again and again during the day. Below is a scrapbook of borrowed images which appeared on Twitter this afternoon and evening.

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Books on a Diet

medievalbooks

We’re all familiar with that most popular of New Year’s resolutions – and the one that is broken most frequently afterwards. While many oversized medieval books look like they enjoyed life to the max, this post is devoted to a relatively rare kind of manuscript that is much slimmer than what you would expect (Fig. 1). “Expect”, because the relative proportions of manuscripts – the width in relation to the height – form a surprisingly stable feature in medieval book production. In fact, the vast majority of surviving manuscripts have the same relative proportions as our modern paper: their width is around 70% of their height.

British Library, Harley MS 5431 (10th century) Fig. 1 – British Library, Harley MS 5431, 230×85 mm  (10th century) – Source

This stability ought to surprise you. While readers of printed books had little choice as to the physical appearance of the object they read, owners of manuscripts handled a book…

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I Seal Your Sex

Wuji Seshat

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My day exploded in your night
And my letters came to life
In your bed, all the poems
In my heart took shape their
In the undressing of our lives

Silently we approached
The hour of the Goddess
And all my dreams
Of platinum literature
Took root in the tree of your womb

I open the lips of your night
Without speaking, but with
A lifetime of poetry carried
In my soul, like golden grapes
I give to you the shadows of the moon

The whiteness of infinity
Your rose burns through the snow
Your flesh dangerously close
To the dawn, and we repeat
The cycle eternally

Male and female, active and passive
Lovingly with all the sleep
And literature and art in our bones.

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Look: Motherism & Gender Assigment

I stopped sitting in front of terminals & laptops as a cost and eye saving device. I also know it can get in the way of my heart work. That does not mean it has lost its worth for me as an important means of communication. Both the Gender Assignment blog & the content posted there us on area of interest among others. I hope it becomes so for you.

Also Lise Haller Baggesen Ross–look her up: https://m.facebook.com/lise.h.ross?pn_ref=story&fref=nf&ref=bookmark
http://genderassignment.tumblr.com/post/106749478255/mothernism-an-interview-with-lise-haller-baggesen